Moving Life

I am a Urban & Regional Planning student at Michigan State University. This blog is in many ways an exploration of people in places and how people come to define and relate to place.
nprfreshair:

"The anonymous urban explorer/photographer behind Detroiturbex.com is building a photographic record of Detroit’s abandoned buildings as way to spread awareness about the plight of the once thriving metropolis. As part of the project, the photographer has created a series of then and now composites that show the astonishingly rapid disintegration of Detroit’s abandoned buildings.”
Yesterday’s interview with Bruce Katz, co-author of The Metropolitan Revolution  talks explicitly about Detroit and why he thinks the city has “good bones.”
via  Laughing Squid

nprfreshair:

"The anonymous urban explorer/photographer behind Detroiturbex.com is building a photographic record of Detroit’s abandoned buildings as way to spread awareness about the plight of the once thriving metropolis. As part of the project, the photographer has created a series of then and now composites that show the astonishingly rapid disintegration of Detroit’s abandoned buildings.”


Yesterday’s interview with Bruce Katz, co-author of The Metropolitan Revolution  talks explicitly about Detroit and why he thinks the city has “good bones.”

via  Laughing Squid

Neither cities nor places in them are unordered, unplanned; the question is only whose order, whose planning, for what purpose?

Peter Marcuse in Not chaos, but walls: Postmodernism and the partitioned city (via urbandifference)

(via urbanfunscape)

CITY BREATHS: Food as an Urban Connector

citybreaths:

image

I am sure you know Monocle magazine. Not everyone is aware of the fact that Monocle also does radio. I have been a longtime fan of one of their podcasts in particular: The Urbanist, a weekly show about urban affairs, featuring a diverse range of themes in a fresh tone of voice and…

Creativity is just connecting things. When you ask creative people how they did something, they feel a little guilty because they didn’t really do it, they just saw something. It seemed obvious to them after a while. That’s because they were able to connect experiences they’ve had and synthesize new things. And the reason they were able to do that was that they’ve had more experiences or they have thought more about their experiences than other people. “Unfortunately, that’s too rare a commodity. A lot of people in our industry haven’t had very diverse experiences. So they don’t have enough dots to connect, and they end up with very linear solutions without a broad perspective on the problem. The broader one’s understanding of the human experience, the better design we will have.

—Steve Jobs (via inthenoosphere)

(via urbnist)

transatlanticurbanism:

danpoharyskyiillustration:

Drawing of New Yorks ‘Woolworth Building’. Built in 1913 in a flamboyant Gothic style it was the tallest building in the world until 1930. Seen here soaring high above the other buildings around it and dominating the skyline beyond the Brooklyn Bridge. 

This is gorgeous.

transatlanticurbanism:

danpoharyskyiillustration:

Drawing of New Yorks ‘Woolworth Building’. Built in 1913 in a flamboyant Gothic style it was the tallest building in the world until 1930. Seen here soaring high above the other buildings around it and dominating the skyline beyond the Brooklyn Bridge. 

This is gorgeous.

yuriartibise:

Mind the Gap! Hazards on Point Grey Road by HUB: Your Cycling Connection

American architect Seth Goodman is on a mission to illustrate the absurdity of parking requirements. The above image, shows mandatory parking requirements for office buildings in different American cities.

Goodman notes that the majority of U.S. cities exempt their downtowns from these requirements, but says that’s not enough.”In many of these cities, the relatively small footprint of these exempt areas has failed achieve the critical mass necessary to create robust transit ridership and fully-functioning pedestrian oriented communities.”

It’s kind of crazy right? maybe a way to address this would be to change parking requirements if a building is located within 800m of a regular and reliable form of public transportation? imagine all the extra space!

More info here.

via imaginingcities:

(via fuckyeahurbandesign)

npr:

More than ever, Americans are getting to work by driving alone. NPR’s Planet Money team takes a look at the decline in public transportation and carpooling, even though carpool lanes have increased.

Read the rest at NPR.org.

(Graphs: Shiva Koohi/NPR)

(via mlwalla)