Moving Life

I am a Urban & Regional Planning student at Michigan State University. This blog is in many ways an exploration of people in places and how people come to define and relate to place.

dcycledesign:

secretrepublic:

Protected Intersections For Bicyclists

…Excellent illustration of next generation bicycle infrastructure. Some examples of this exist in the Netherlands (and to a lesser degree Denmark), but regardless of the city, we need to be planning our streets for the next 50 years today. That means appropriately forward thinking infrastructure, not just the bare minimum expected at the moment.

-Kasey

While U.S. transportation planners and civil engineers keep doing their homework at a snails pace, i’ll accept sharrows any day.

(via theurbancyclist)

urbnfutr:

The train I was on just broke down and we all had to get off and go back to the stop I started at. How is your Monday morning going? (at CTA - California)

urbnfutr:

The train I was on just broke down and we all had to get off and go back to the stop I started at. How is your Monday morning going? (at CTA - California)

If you design streets and cars, you get streets and cars. If you design places and people, you get places and people.

—William H. Whyte (via publicdesignfestival)

megalopoliscity:

LA


First photo is an unknown photographer, second one is thanks to Matt Givot

The second photo shows off the lot where the future Metropolis Mega project will be.

Being a woman is kind of like being a cyclist in a city where all the cars represent men. You’re supposed to be able to share the road equally with cars, but that’s not how it works. The roads are built for cars and you spend a great deal of physical and mental energy being defensive and trying not to get hurt. Some of the cars WANT you to get hurt. They think you don’t have any place on the road at all. And if you do get hurt by a car, everyone makes excuses that it’s your fault.

A friend of a friend (via bettycockroach)

Sad because it’s true. 

(via atheoryofmaking)

Wow.

(via karibikes)

a while back i made a similar post called 'transportation in america as a metaphor for privilege', so, yeah, SECONDED

(via julierthanyou)

(Source: onesmallflowerofeternity, via thegreenurbanist)